Ken Winneg and Kathleen Hall Jamieson published in Presidential Studies Quarterly

Ken Winneg, Ph.D., managing director of the National Annenberg Election Survey (NAES), and Annenberg Public Policy Director Kathleen Hall Jamieson, Ph.D., published an article, “Party Identification in the 2008 Presidential Election,” in Presidential Studies Quarterly (June 2010; published online April 2010) using data from the 2008 NAES telephone rolling cross-sectional survey and Internet Panel. Article abstract: In the

APPC’s Ken Winneg co-authors paper published in the American Journal of Political Science

Ken Winneg, Managing Director of the National Annenberg Election Survey, co-authored a paper, “The World Wide Web and the U.S. Political News Market,” published in the American Journal of Political Science (April 2010), with lead author Norman H. Nie, Stanford University; Darwin W. Miller, III, RAND Corporation; Saar Golde, Stanford University; and Daniel M. Butler,

American public still has much to learn about presidential candidates’ issue positions as campaign end draws near, Annenberg Survey shows

Many Americans are unable to identify where the major party candidates stand on various issues ranging from abortion to free trade to closing the base at which alleged enemy fighters are held at Guantanamo Bay, according to recent data collected by the University of Pennsylvania’s National Annenberg Election Survey (NAES). Only 30 percent of adults

American public has much to learn about presidential candidates’ issue positions, National Annenberg Election Survey shows

Many Americans are unable to identify where the major party candidates’ stand on various issues ranging from health care to abortion to free trade, according to recent data collected by the University of Pennsylvania’s National Annenberg Election Survey. Only a little over a quarter (28 percent) of adults were able to identify Senator John McCain

Support for the presidential ticket and identification with party predicted convention speech viewing

The Democratic and Republican Convention’s speech audiences tended to be made up of supporters. Nearly two-thirds of those who saw or heard all of Senator Clinton’s speech and about three-fourths of those who saw or heard all of Senator Obama’s speech said they backed the Democratic nominee. Similarly, about six in ten of those who saw