FlackCheck.org launches today

FlackCheck.org, a counterpart to APPC’s award-winning program FactCheck.org, made its official debut today. The website produces original video parodies that debunk false political advertising, poke fun at extreme language, and hold the media accountable for their reporting on political campaigns. Among the newest additions to FlackCheck.org’s growing library of videos are the first two in

Leonore Annenberg Institute for Civics Receives Multiple Honors

Two films on the making of laws – How a Bill Becomes a Federal Law and Presidential Signing Statements ­– have received 2009 Bronze Telly Awards in the education category. The films were developed by the Leonore Annenberg Institute for Civics (LAIC), a multimedia civics education program administered by the Annenberg Public Policy Center, to

How a Bill Becomes a Federal Law wins Videographer Award

How a Bill Becomes a Federal Law, produced by the Documentary Group of New York City for the Leonore Annenberg Institute for Civics, has won a Videographer Award of Excellence. The video, produced for use in schools as part of Annenberg Classroom, describes the processes by which an idea is transformed into legislation and eventually

Public Service Ads Win Bronze Telly Awards

For the second year, public service announcements promoting HIV awareness among young African-Americans have been singled out for honors.  The three ads encourage young people in high-risk cities to resist peer pressure to have sex and to consider the impact that a sexually transmitted disease can have on one’s future. The ads were produced by

FactCheck – In Action!

FactCheck.org, the Annenberg Public Policy Center’s popular and oft-quoted political truth squad, launched a new video report today, hosted by FactCheck reporter Emi Kolawole.  New reports will be posted each Friday morning. In addition to being available on FactCheck’s home page and to FactCheck’s 66,000 email subscribers, the report, known as “Just the Facts,” will

Judicial Campaigns: Money, Mudslinging and an Erosion of Public Trust

Thirty-nine states elect their judges in some fashion. What once were “sleepy little affairs,” judicial campaigns have become high-stakes races, drawing in big money and increasingly negative advertising campaigns. In 2006, an estimated $16 million was spent on advertising in supreme court races in 10 states, a record. If predictions hold true, contests in 2008

FactCheck.ED, new classroom website, is unveiled

FactCheckED, a new website designed to help high school students learn to think analytically, has been launched. An offshoot of the prize-winning FactCheck.org website (www.factcheck.org), FactCheckED (www.FactCheckED.org) will offer tools that enable students to search out accurate and unbiased information and in the process become better informed consumers and citizens. In addition, FactCheckED offers lesson plans for