Books

Cultivation Theory: Its History, Current Status, and Future Directions

Cultivation theory, in late 1960s, rested on the recognition that industrialized mass-mediated storytelling, most clearly exemplified by television (TV) programming, the dominant entertainment medium of American culture. This chapter briefly describes cultivation theory, the ways it has been challenged, and how its role can be understood and further evaluated in our rapidly changing media environment.
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Electing the President, 2012: The Insiders’ View

On December 6, 2012, prominent members of President Obama’s and Mitt Romney’s election staffs met for a debriefing of this tumultuous election cycle. This book provides an overview and an edited transcript of the all-day event, along with a DVD and timeline of election year milestones. Electing the President, 2012 offers a detailed look into the internal machinery of a presidential campaign and insight into the principles that drive outcomes in a democratic election.
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Finding Consensual Fact in Political Debate

Consensual fact is needed to ground engaged argument. One advances an argument from agreed-upon ground that serves as the foundation for the case being made. Among those disposed to contest inconvenient data, engaged debate is made possible, in part, by the existence of institutional sources that each side considers methodologically sophisticated as well as expert in the subject of the debate.
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The Dynamic Genome and Mental Health

While it is widely accepted that we are products of our genes and environment, misconceptions about the power of genes to control our destiny continue to dominate our discourse. This volume contains the latest theories and evidence supporting the interrelation between genes and environments as they influence the development, mental health, and substance use of adolescents.
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The Rolling Cross-Section: Design and Utility for Political Research

Cross-sectional surveys have been a mainstay of scholarly work in political communication. These surveys constitute a snapshot of public opinion. A cross-section refers to data that have been collected at a single point in time. When there is no reason to believe that the attitudes, beliefs, and/or knowledge of sampled respondents differ from day to day, this means of knowing invites plausible inferences. Communication scholars, however, are often interested in the changes that take place in attitudes, beliefs, and/or knowledge from exposure to messages.
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