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Holiday-Suicide Link: Newspapers Continue to Perpetuate the Myth

Despite no basis in fact, newspapers continue to report on the increased risk of suicide around the Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year holidays. An analysis of newspaper reporting over the past seven years released today by the Annenberg Public Policy Center shows that this story represents about half of all holiday-relevant suicide reporting. Stories linking

Likelihood of HPV Vaccination Affected by How Information Is Presented, Penn Study Reveals

The way that the vaccine for human papillomavirus is described can affect whether women decide to seek vaccination, according to a study by researchers at the Center of Excellence in Cancer Communication Research of the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg School for Communication. The research was presented in Boston at the American Association for Cancer Research’s

Public Support for Condom Instruction Strong; Support for Abstinence-Only Programs Low, New Survey Finds

Abstinence-only sex education programs – a favorite of the Bush administration but criticized by many health experts – are not supported by a large majority of the American public, regardless of their political or religious ideologies, a new survey has found. Eighty percent of those surveyed favored a sex education curriculum that includes information about

Internet Ranks Highest for Promoting Political Awareness and Civic Involvement Among Young People

The Internet is the best information source for promoting political awareness and civic engagement among youths aged 14-22, according to findings reported in the June issue of Communication Research. Conversely, a heavy diet of television viewing lowered political awareness. Newspaper consumption among youths heightened political knowledge, but did little to motivate the readers to become