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Michael Rozansky has worked as an editor, writer and reporter for 30 years. Before joining the Annenberg Public Policy Center as director of communications, he spent more than 20 years at the Philadelphia Inquirer, most recently supervising its arts and entertainment coverage. He has reported on the arts, media, business, politics, national and regulatory issues. Rozansky also developed and taught a class at Temple University on the history and practice of celebrity journalism. He received a bachelor’s degree in English and American literature from Brown University and a master’s degree in journalism from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. 

Declining visibility of tobacco use on TV linked to drop in smoking rates

The declining visibility of tobacco products on prime-time U.S. broadcast television shows is linked to a drop in smoking of nearly two packs of cigarettes per adult per year, according to a study by Annenberg Public Policy Center researchers published online in the journal Tobacco Control. The study found that the drop in portrayals of smoking and tobacco use in TV dramas mirrored the decline in consumption

Household smoking bans found effective at curtailing home cigarette use

A pair of studies involving more than 450 parents in Philadelphia that examined the effects of household smoking bans found that homes that imposed smoking bans were effective at reducing the number of cigarettes smoked at home. One study, in the American Journal of Public Health, found that smoking levels in a home did not determine whether a home imposed a ban; the other, in Preventive Medicine, profiled smoking policies in homes with children under the age of 13.

Scholars confer on ‘Patterns of Deception’ and more

In January, the Annenberg Public Policy Center brought together scholars in the fields of communication and debate and speech at a conference in Honolulu to review and make recommendations on current projects at the policy center, ranging from FlackCheck.org's Patterns of Deception videos to Tobacco Watch to an examination of presidential debates.

School drug tests ineffective but a ‘positive climate’ might work

A national study of teenagers suggests that school drug testing did not deter them from starting to smoke tobacco or marijuana or drink alcohol. But in high schools that had a “positive school climate,” teens were less likely to start smoke cigarettes or marijuana, according to the study, in the January issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. The study compared the effectiveness over one year of school policies of student drug testing with a positive school climate.

Biggest Deceptions of 2013

It's that time of year again: Time to look back at some of the year's biggest deceptions. The award-winning site FactCheck.org and its companion site, FlackCheck.org, offer a rundown and video looking at some of the year's biggest whoppers. No surprise: Some of them centered on the Affordable Care Act. But FactCheck.org also found noteworthy nonsense about immigration, gun control, Benghazi and the IRS.

Annenberg Classroom documentaries win CINE Golden Eagle awards

Annenberg Classroom’s documentaries “The Right to Remain Silent: Miranda v. Arizona” and “Search and Seizure: Mapp v. Ohio” have received the CINE Golden Eagle Award. The 25-minute film “The Right to Remain Silent” details the U.S. Supreme Court case of Miranda v. Arizona, the landmark decision that ensured the right to consult an attorney and