A handgun being fired

Parents Become Less Sensitive to Violence and Sex in Movies: Study

Parents can become desensitized to violence and sex in movies after watching only a few scenes with disturbing content, according to a new study published in Pediatrics that was conducted by researchers at the Annenberg Public Policy Center. The study comes as scenes of sex and violence become more prevalent in movies aimed at youth. A 2013 study in Pediatrics from APPC researchers showed that the amount of violence in PG-13 movies tripled in the most popular movies since 1985.

Movie violence associated with sex, alcohol and tobacco use

Nearly 90 percent of the top-grossing movies over a 25-year period show main characters acting violently, and in 77 percent of the movies those characters also engage in sex-, alcohol- or tobacco-related behavior, a new study has shown. The study published in Pediatrics, by researchers at the Annenberg Public Policy Center, found that more than half of the biggest PG-13 movies featured a main character acting violently and involved in either drinking, sexual behavior or smoking within a five-minute segment.

Research on the long-term effects of a media intervention on adolescent sexual behavior released in AJPH

Research conducted at APPC by Michael Hennessy, Ph.D., and Daniel Romer, Ph.D., among other project sites, was released in the January 2013 issue of the American Journal of Public Health. “Safer Sex Media Messages and Adolescent Sexual Behavior: 3-Year Follow-Up Results From Project iMPPACS” abstract: Objectives. We estimated the long-term (36-month) effects of Project iMPPACS, a

APPC and Ohio State researchers help understand the influence of maternal sexual communication on adolescent risky sexual behaviors

When mothers engage in frequent sexual discussions with their teenagers but fail to express clear disapproval of teenagers’ sexual involvement, their efforts are more likely to result in greater risky sexual involvement by their teen, according to a new study published in the Journal of Adolescent Health. The study was conducted by Atika Khurana, postdoctoral

Annenberg Research Helps Explain Early Sexual Initiation in Adolescents

Findings point to lack of self-control but not sensation seeking Cognitive training could reduce the risk   FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE DATE: 6 March 2012 CONTACT: Dan Romer, 215-898-6776 (office); 610-202-7315 (cell)   In a study published in Developmental Psychology, researchers at the Annenberg Public Policy Center and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia have identified two components

APPC Health Communication team published in Health Education & Behavior

Lead author Amy Bleakley, Ph.D., Michael Hennessy, Ph.D., both Senior Research Analysts, Martin Fishbein, Ph.D., the former director of the Health Communication program at APPC, and Amy Jordan, Ph.D., director of the Media and the Developing Child program, co-authored a paper – "Using the Integrative Model to Explain How Exposure to Sexual Media Content Influences