Holiday-Suicide Link: Newspapers Continue to Perpetuate the Myth

Despite no basis in fact, newspapers continue to report on the increased risk of suicide around the Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year holidays. An analysis of newspaper reporting over the past seven years released today by the Annenberg Public Policy Center shows that this story represents about half of all holiday-relevant suicide reporting. Stories linking

Likelihood of HPV Vaccination Affected by How Information Is Presented, Penn Study Reveals

The way that the vaccine for human papillomavirus is described can affect whether women decide to seek vaccination, according to a study by researchers at the Center of Excellence in Cancer Communication Research of the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg School for Communication. The research was presented in Boston at the American Association for Cancer Research’s

Holiday Suicide Reporting Gets More Accurate

The Media and the Holiday Suicide Myth: Press Reporting of the Link Declines The percentage of stories debunking the holiday-suicide myth has more than doubled since 1999. Based on a review of over 300 stories published over a six-year period there has been a drop in the number of stories in which the holiday-suicide link

Card Playing Trend in Young People Continues

About 2.9 Million Young People Gamble on Cards in Average Week; Increased Use of Internet Gambling Sites Also Observed The results of the Annenberg Public Policy Center’s 2005 National Annenberg Risk Survey of Youth (NARSY) indicate that the likelihood that young men will gamble on card games continues to increase. Download the full news release