Parents’ TV Viewing Habits Influence Kids’ Screen Time

The amount of time that children and teens spend watching television may have more to do with their parents’ TV habits than with family media rules or the location of TVs within the home, according to a study in the August 2013 issue of Pediatrics, “The Relationship Between Parents’ and Children’s Television Viewing,” published online

Children, Adolescents, and the Media now in its third edition

Children, Adolescents, and the Media (Sage, Third Edition, 2013), co-authored by Victor C. Strasburger, M.D., University of New Mexico School of Medicine,  Barbara J. Wilson, Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and APPC Area Director Amy B. Jordan, Ph.D., has been updated to reflect cutting-edge research on the impact of media on youth. (From the

APPC research published in Zero to Three

The results of a study by APPC researchers Sarah E. Vaala, Ph.D., Amy Bleakley, Ph.D., and Amy B. Jordan, Ph.D., were published in the journal Zero to Three (March 2013)   “The media environments and television-viewing diets of infants and toddlers”   Abstract: High rates of infant and toddler screen media use coupled with research

Kathleen Hall Jamieson contributes essay to Daedalus

APPC Director Kathleen Hall Jamieson, Ph.D., wrote an essay, “The Challenges Facing Civic Education in the 21st Century,” published in the spring 2013 issue of Daedalus, the journal of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences.   Abstract: This essay explores the value and state of civics education in the United States and identifies five

Research on the long-term effects of a media intervention on adolescent sexual behavior released in AJPH

Research conducted at APPC by Michael Hennessy, Ph.D., and Daniel Romer, Ph.D., among other project sites, was released in the January 2013 issue of the American Journal of Public Health. “Safer Sex Media Messages and Adolescent Sexual Behavior: 3-Year Follow-Up Results From Project iMPPACS” abstract: Objectives. We estimated the long-term (36-month) effects of Project iMPPACS, a

APPC study published in Communication Research

Research examining the effects of adolescent exposure to sexual content on television conducted by APPC scholars Jeffrey A. Gottfried, Ph.D., Sarah Vaala, Ph.D., Amy Bleakley, Ph.D., Michael Hennessy, Ph.D., and Amy Jordan, Ph.D., has been published in the journal Communication Research (February 2013). Article abstract: Using the Integrated Model of Behavioral Prediction, this study examines

Use of effective coping strategies is associated with reduced suicidal ideation among both male and female youth

But males are more successful in reducing stress than females   In a study recently published in Prevention Science, researchers at the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania found that youth who naturally use effective coping strategies to deal with interpersonal stressors (such as bullying) experience lower levels of perceived stress, feelings

APPC and Ohio State researchers help understand the influence of maternal sexual communication on adolescent risky sexual behaviors

When mothers engage in frequent sexual discussions with their teenagers but fail to express clear disapproval of teenagers’ sexual involvement, their efforts are more likely to result in greater risky sexual involvement by their teen, according to a new study published in the Journal of Adolescent Health. The study was conducted by Atika Khurana, postdoctoral