New article using NASY data published in Nicotine & Tobacco Research

“Smoking, parent smoking, depressed mood, and suicidal ideation in teens,” a paper using data from the 2002 National Annenberg Survey of Youth (NASY) to investigate a possible relationship between smoking and suicidal ideation in teens, is now available online.
 
Article abstract:
 
Objectives: We address whether smoking is related to suicidal ideation in teens and whether there is evidence of a causal pathway.
 
Methods: We use data from the 2002 National Annenberg Survey of Youth and employ multivariate logistic regression to model each teen’s risk of suicidal ideation as a function of self-report of depressive symptoms, own smoking, parent smoking, and demographic and household income variables.
 
Results: Individuals reporting depressive symptoms have an increased risk of suicidal ideation (odds ratio [OR] = 13.13; 95% CI = 5.98–28.81). Relative to teens who do not smoke and whose parents do not smoke, teens who smoke and do not have a parent who smokes have increased risk of suicidal ideation (OR = 8.10; 95% CI = 2.88–22.80), whereas those with a parent who smokes do not have a statistically significant increased risk of suicidal ideation regardless of teen smoking behavior.

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