Dietram A. Scheufele, University of Wisconsin-Madison

The Brave New World of (Science) Communication: How We All Make Sense of Complex Information in Modern News Environments: Dietram Scheufele is John E. Ross Professor in Science Communication and Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor at U.W.-Madison. Abstract: We live in a world in which it is possible for citizens to access more (scientific) information with less effort than ever before. At the same time, politically divided news environments have created a world of filter bubbles and echo chambers that allow us to only hear what we already believe in. What are the effects of these new news environments on our democracy? And why are we as a country less equipped than ever before to debate controversial issues with each other in a civil fashion? This talk will explore some of these questions and what the latest research tells us about causes and possible solutions.

About the Speaker

Dietram A. Scheufele is the John E. Ross Professor in Science Communication and Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and in the Morgridge Institute for Research. He is also an Honorary Professor of Communication at the Technische Universität Dresden, Germany, and, during the fall 2015 semester, will be a Distinguished Visiting Scholar at the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania.Scheufele's research deals with the public and political interfaces of emerging science. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters, and a member of the German National Academy of Science and Engineering.In the past, Scheufele has been a tenured faculty member at Cornell University, a Shorenstein fellow at Harvard University, and a DAAD Visiting Professor at the Technische Universität Dresden (Germany). His consulting experience includes work for PBS, the World Health Organization, the World Bank, and other corporate and public sector clients in the U.S., Asia, Europe, and the Middle East.