Biggest Deceptions of 2013

It's that time of year again: Time to look back at some of the year's biggest deceptions. The award-winning site FactCheck.org and its companion site, FlackCheck.org, offer a rundown and video looking at some of the year's biggest whoppers. No surprise: Some of them centered on the Affordable Care Act. But FactCheck.org also found noteworthy nonsense about immigration, gun control, Benghazi and the IRS.

Annenberg Classroom documentaries win CINE Golden Eagle awards

Annenberg Classroom’s documentaries “The Right to Remain Silent: Miranda v. Arizona” and “Search and Seizure: Mapp v. Ohio” have received the CINE Golden Eagle Award. The 25-minute film “The Right to Remain Silent” details the U.S. Supreme Court case of Miranda v. Arizona, the landmark decision that ensured the right to consult an attorney and

Annenberg arts fellow Richard Mosse honored by Foreign Policy as ‘Global Thinker’

Photographer and filmmaker Richard Mosse, a 2008 Leonore Annenberg Arts Fellow, has been named one of Foreign Policy magazine’s “Leading Global Thinkers” of 2013. Mosse is featured for his innovative photographic vision among some of the world’s most influential people, including German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Secretary of State John Kerry, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, and Pope Francis.

Movie violence associated with sex, alcohol and tobacco use

Nearly 90 percent of the top-grossing movies over a 25-year period show main characters acting violently, and in 77 percent of the movies those characters also engage in sex-, alcohol- or tobacco-related behavior, a new study has shown. The study published in Pediatrics, by researchers at the Annenberg Public Policy Center, found that more than half of the biggest PG-13 movies featured a main character acting violently and involved in either drinking, sexual behavior or smoking within a five-minute segment.

Sarah Vaala published in the Journal of Children and Media

Sarah E. Vaala, Ph.D., Martin Fishbein Postdoctoral Fellow at the Annenberg Public Policy Center, and Robert Hornik, Ph.D., Wilbur Schramm Professor of Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication, have published the article “Predicting US Infants’ and Toddlers’ TV/Video Viewing Rates: Mothers’ Cognitions and Structural Life Circumstances” in the Journal of Children and Media. Abstract: